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2019-May10
 

Belted Galloway Cattle

There are additional photos on the Cattle page.

I will accept serious offers on these cattle. See my estimated values in the description of each cow.

Please contact me to schedule a visit if you want to see them in person before submitting an offer.

2018 American Royal Steak Competition: Drum roll please, we came in 5th (out of 15)! Click here for the official press release of our placement.

You can see the full results here (PDF). My entry number is 330. I am SO pleased! To be only 3 spots down from an award blows my mind. YIPPEE! According to the documentation, PlayHaven Farm LLC was the ONLY Belted Galloway (7/8 with 1/8 Brangus) represented in either the Grass Fed or Grain Fed categories.

FYI, the 2018 Retail Beef is from the steer that the competition steaks came from... so you can taste for yourself why we did so well. :)

Information from my Beltie mentor at Worstell Farm:

“Your cattle are all very docile, and not easily excited. If the people who are interested are first-time cattle owners, then maybe you want to tell them that you can hand-feed them or scratch their heads or flanks.
We don't have anything that you couldn't simply walk across the pasture and not worry. (You CANNOT say that about most any other breed - particularly when you talk about bulls.)

On that bull - emphasize that the Beltie breed is able to service a herd for 10 years or more. I just read yesterday that they can live as old as 18 years. Angus bulls are only good for 3 years, then you sell them and buy another. The guy who built our house - and got three of our heifers as part of it - bought his Beltie bull at 5 years old and has had him several years.

The other point of buying a Beltie bull, as we did, was to improve the genetics of your herd and bring the overall carcass size down while you also get genetically-tender beef, with better taste (as long as you keep them grassfed.) University studies echo some ranchers who say that if you bring down your average weight by 100lbs., you can get another 20% more cattle on your acreage. Meanwhile, those slightly smaller-weight calves bring more at the market - so your profits go up.

Beltie bulls are also great for first-time heifers, since they throw a small calf that grows fast. Beltie heifers make great mothers and will still throw a small calve to a larger bull (but who in their right mind would want to do that?!?) Your bull will be able to service a full-size cow.

You can see why they have the reputation for being the most efficient breed at meat production. Stocky and short-legged. Angus are taller and you lose a lot of weight in those long, thin legs.

Our own heifers/cows keep getting calmer and calmer.

You may want to talk about the breed itself. Galloways (as you know) are great first-herd animals. They are very easy to deal with, and survive well in both summer and winter due to that hair coat they have. You got a great deal in that we spend a lot of time working with these heifers to get them used to people. Since you've been working with them (and they had their calves) they settle down quite a bit.  Also, while you have pretty uniform pastures, Belties eat a much wider variety of forage than most breeds (only Highland cattle, and maybe Longhorns) eat a wider variety. Generally, the harsher environment the breed started out from is how well they'll adapt to any scene they encounter.
If I were starting up, I'd scoop up the whole set from you, as it's a perfect starter herd.


Here’s what I found about Belted Galloway Cattle on the internet:

(www.cattle-exchange.com)
Origin of Breed
The Belted Galloway's first recorded history indicates that they developed during the 16th century in the former Galloway district of Scotland, although references to “sheeted” cattle have occurred in art and literature as early as the 11th century. The Belted Galloway is essentially the same in origin and characteristics as the Galloway except the distinctive white belt that is thought to have been introduced by an infusion of Dutch Belted blood, probably in the 17th or 18th century. They are often referred to as “Belties,” and have been recorded in herd books since 1852.
Physical Description
The Belted Galloway is a very distinctive with its white belt that encircles the body. The rest of the body is black, dun or red in color. The distinctive white belt often varies somewhat in width and regularity but usually covers most of the body from the shoulders to the hooks. Belted Galloways are naturally polled cattle. Belties do not develop much fat under their hides; instead they have a double coat of hair consisting of a dense, soft, short undercoat and a long, shaggy overcoat, which is usually cast in hot weather. This double coat provides excellent protection in cold, wet and windy weather. The Belted Galloway cow has about 4,000 hairs per square inch making their coat resistant to severe cold conditions.
In general, the mature Belted Galloway bull weighs within the 1,800 to 2,000 lb. The mature Beltie cow averages 1,100 to 1,300 lb. At birth, bull calves usually weigh 70 to 80 lb. while heifer calves about 10 lb. less.
Defining Characteristics
The breed is known for their grazing ability, longevity (17-20 years) and hardiness.
Belted Galloways have excellent calving ease, feed efficiency, and great marketability to consumers.
Belted Galloway carcasses have a total fat content of about 2%, a low percentage. Data collected in the U.S. has shown that the beef dresses out at 60 - 62% of live weight making it a profitable breed. Their meat contains only 1% saturated fat, which is fitting for health conscious consumers. Their meat can also be marketed in a variety of specialty niches, such as organic and grass-fed beef.

 (www.beltie.org/guidelines-for-selecting.php)
Other Desirable Breed Characteristics

Disposition/Behavior: Belted Galloways should be of a calm and quiet disposition. They should not exhibit panic when approached, which can be determined by ears perking, excessively alert eyes, and constant defecation. They should not exhibit aggressive behavior toward humans, even when penned. 

Maternal Characteristics: Cows should calve easily without assistance. They should exhibit immediate care of the newborn calf, and neither abandon nor surrender the calf. Protection of the calf in moderation is desirable, excessive protectiveness is helpful when cattle are in the “wild” but not within confined arrangement, as it may be dangerous. Cows should rebreed 90 days after calving. 

Milk Production: Cows should produce sufficient milk for rapid development of calf. Udder and teats should appear symmetrical and healthy during lactation. 

Foraging Characteristics: Cattle should feed aggressively on available pasture and utilize not only grass but also appropriate non-grass species when available. 

Meatiness: Cows should produce offspring with finished carcass weights of 60-62% of their live weights. Carcass weights should be Choice or better. 

Hardiness: Cattle should require minimal health care throughout life, be resistant to parasites and be able to “survive” on limited nutrients. They should adapt to environments of marked heat or cold with minimal stress, weight loss, or interruption of reproduction. They should remain active and vigorous well into their teens. 

(http://beltie.org/history-attributes.php)
The Belted Galloway heifer is generally bred at age 14 to 18 months, with many breeders electing to breed at 700 to 800 lbs. without regard to months of age. The mature Beltie cow at age 3 or 4 averages 1100 to 1300 lbs. She can be expected to annually produce a healthy calf well into her teen years.


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Belted Galloway, Unregistered Bull

 

Fernie is NOT registered but is a pure-blooded Belted Galloway (of unknown pedigree). I purchased him from Blackwater Bend Farm in 2013. His date of birth is estimated to be June 2012. He was weaned in October 2012. As of this Spring his weight was estimated at 1500 lbs (+/-). He carries a recessive gene for red*.

I have not done any tests for semen counts. He has successfully bred all of my cows to produce calves since 2014. Each steer out of Fernie has weighed an average of 820 pounds at processing (between 18 and 24 months of age).

I keep Fernie with the rest of the herd to maintain the family unit. He is a pleasant member of the herd in that he is not overly pushy to the cows and likes to play with the calves. He has not been pushy with me or my husband, but we respect him as a bull. Ten (10) of the fourteen (14) calves he has produced have full belts.

Beltie bulls can live to be as old as 18 years and breed even full size cows for 10 years (or more); because of this and Fernie being a bull in his prime from a closed herd, trained to Management Intensive Grazing (also known as Strip Grazing or Mob Grazing), I have reduced the price to $1,000 (OBO) sold separately or $3,000 for the entire group of 1 bull + 3 bred cows.

*We discovered that Fernie and Nike both carry the RED recessive gene because their calf born 7-9-18 is a red heifer with a full belt.

Fernie, Autumn 2015 (already getting his winter coat).


Fernie, Autumn 2018


 

Belted Galloway Type, Bred Cows

I have three (3) Belted Galloway Type (not pure-blooded) Cows from the same bull and different cows.

Each has been bred by Fernie as of January 8, 2019 and are expected to calve between June and October 2019.


 

Button is half Brahma/Angus and half Belted Galloway. She is all black with a small white spot on her left side. I purchased her from Worstell Farm in 2013. Her date of birth is March 26, 2012. She was vaccinated for Brucellosis before we purchased her. I have not weighed her but estimate her weight to be 1000 lbs.

All of her calves have been born without assistance.

She was bred the first time at 20 months of age by Fernie and delivered a bull calf (black with a full white belt) on August 20, 2014.

She was bred the second time 3.5 months after the first calving and delivered a heifer calf (black with a white patch on its left side that looks like a hand print) on September 14, 2015.

Her third breeding was 3 weeks after the 2nd calving and she delivered a bull calf (black with a full belt) July 13, 2016.

She was bred on or about January 8, 2017 and delivered a heifer calf (black with a white patch on each side, not a full belt) on October 18, 2017.

Her fifth breeding was 1 month after the 4th calving and she delivered a heifer calf (black with a full belt) on August 28, 2018. Weaning is scheduled for March 2019.

Button is very friendly. She is a good mother and not overly domineering of her calf. Beltie cows can produce healthy calves well into their teens. She was trained to Management Intensive Grazing (also known as Strip Grazing or Mob Grazing) before she came to me.

I have reduced the price to $1,000 (OBO) sold separately or $3,000 for the entire group of 1 bull + 3 bred cows.


Button, left side


Button, right side.


 

Nike is half Brahma/Angus and half Belted Galloway. She is all black with a partial belt across her stomach that tapers up her right side about half-way (it resembles the “swish” of the Nike brand… thus her name) and she has a small patch of white on her left side. I purchased her from Worstell Farm in 2013. Her date of birth is April 10, 2012. She was vaccinated for Brucellosis before we purchased her. I have not weighed her but estimate her weight to be 1000 lbs.

All of her calves have been born without assistance.

She was bred the first time at 20 months of age by Fernie and delivered a heifer calf (black with a full white belt) on September 24, 2014.

She was bred 1 month after the first calving and delivered a bull calf (black with a full white belt) on August 4, 2015.

Her third breeding was 1 month after calving and she delivered a heifer calf (black with a partial belt, left of backbone around to belly) on June 14, 2016.

She was bred 3 months after calving and delivered a bull calf (black with a partial belt, white on the left side) on June 24, 2017.

Her fifth breeding was 3 months after calving and she delivered a heifer calf (RED* with a full belt) on July 9, 2018. Weaning is scheduled for March 2019.

Nike's right side, front teat (quarter) is completely dry as of the Spring 2018 vet visit. No infection or any other worry present, it is simply no longer functional. All her other teats produced milk.

Nike is a good mother and wanted her first calf always close at hand, but has relaxed some with the other calves. Beltie cows can produce healthy calves well into their teens. She was trained to Management Intensive Grazing (also known as Strip Grazing or Mob Grazing) before she came to me.

I have reduced the price to $1,000 (OBO) sold separately or $3,000 for the entire group of 1 bull + 3 bred cows.

*We discovered that Fernie and Nike both carry the RED recessive gene because their calf borth 7-9-18 is a red heifer with a full belt.


Nike, right side.


Nike, left side.

 

 

Domino is a half Angus and half Belted Galloway. She is black with a full white belt that has a small black spot near the top of her back on the right side. I purchased her as a bred heifer from Worstell Farm in 2015. Her date of birth is July 13, 2013. She was vaccinated for Brucellosis before we purchased her. I have not weighed her but estimate her weight to be 1000 lbs.

All of her calves have been born without assistance.

She was bred the first time at 17 months of age and delivered a bull calf (black with a full white belt) on September 5, 2015.

Her second breeding was 6 weeks after the 1st calving and she delivered a heifer calf (black with a full belt) on August 7, 2016.

She was bred 3 months after calving and delivered a bull calf (black with full belt and a black spot within it on the left side) on August 15, 2017.

Her fourth breeding was 1 month after calving and she delivered a heifer calf (black with a full belt) on June 21, 2018. Weaning is scheduled for March 2019.

Domino is great with all the calves, we often see her "babysitting" them. She was the first to accept the young steer we traded for in 2018. Beltie cows can produce healthy calves well into their teens. She was trained to Management Intensive Grazing (also known as Strip Grazing or Mob Grazing) before she came to me.

I have reduced the price to $1,000 (OBO) sold separately or $3,000 for the entire group of 1 bull + 3 bred cows.


Domino, 2015, right side.


Domino, 2018, left side.


 

Belted Galloway Heifer Calves - SOLD

As the heifer calves are sold, the information below is provided because it relates to the parents who are still for sale (2019Feb11).

I have three (3) Belted Galloway Type (not pure-blooded, see mix in each description) Heifers. All three heifer calves will be weaned in March 2019. They have learned to respect the electric polywire and to move with the herd in Management Intensive Grazing. They are not afraid of people, but we have not encouraged them to interact with us.


Summer, Saffron and Kaylee (left to right AND order of birth)

I would like these heifers kept together, so I am offering a discounted price of $1,800 for the trio.


Summer (born June 21, 2018) is out of Fernie and Domino, which makes her seven-eighths (7/8) Belted Galloway and one-eighth Angus. She is black with a full belt.

Summer (as you may have read on the website) got separated from the herd for a few hours when she was a month old and now doesn't stray far from the herd. She would do best in a multiple cow situation.

She will be weaned in March 2019.

SOLD (2019FEB11)

 


Summer, left side.


Summer, right side (sometimes when you take pictures of black animals, the highlights get blown away... sorry.)


Saffron (born July 9, 2018) is out of Fernie and Nike, which makes her three-quarters Belted Galloway and one-quarter Brahma/Angus. She is red with a full belt.

Red is a normal color in Belted Galloway cattle.

She will be weaned in March 2019.

SOLD (2019FEB11)

 


Saffron, left side.


Saffron, right side.


Kaylee (born August 27, 2018) is out of Fernie and Button, which makes her three-quarters Belted Galloway and one-quarter Brahma/Angus. She is black with a full belt.

Kaylee is the most playful of the three heifer calves and shows the most curiosity.

She will be weaned in March 2019.

SOLD (2019FEB11)

 


Kaylee, left side.


Kaylee, right side.



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